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Friday, September 03, 2004

 Scientists set Internet2 speed record

Scientists at Caltech and CERN have set a new land-speed record for Internet2.

The team, which included folks from AMD, Cisco, Microsoft, Newisys, and S2io, transferred 859 gigabytes of data in less than 17 minutes. It did so at a rate of 6.63 gigabits per second between the CERN facility in Geneva, Switzerland, and Caltech in Pasadena, California -- a distance of more than 15,766 kilometers (approximately 9,800 miles).

This record speed of 6.63Gbps is equivalent to transferring a full-length DVD movie in four seconds. There are uses in astronomy, bioinformatics, global climate modeling and seismology, as well as commercial applications such as entertainment, and oil and gas exploration.


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